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  1. "

    MOKent
    And because most of us submit to neoliberal capitalism and have not insisted on a globalised economy rationalised for the purpose of sustaining inhabitability, simplified by automation, governed by citizen’s forum, driven by academic rigour instead of the profit motive to deliver full quality goods and services for all instead of shoddy goods for most, supplied by mandatory economic service in return for a citizen’s income, every kind creativity - not just of literature - and including the most important creativity of all - the creation of human beings - is sacrificed to the necessity of having to prove that we have earnt the right to every breath we take.

    2 Mar 2014 15:29

    "

  2. Comments
  3. ghosts-in-the-tv:

Gorbals, Glasgow, 1960s.
ghosts-in-the-tv:

Gorbals, Glasgow, 1960s.
    High Resolution

    ghosts-in-the-tv:

    Gorbals, Glasgow, 1960s.

    (Source: urbanrealm.com, via architectureofdoom)

  4. Comments
  5. darylmulvihill:

* on Flickr.
darylmulvihill:

* on Flickr.
    High Resolution

    darylmulvihill:

    * on Flickr.

  6. Comments
  7. darkmountainproject:

Our first week in the world of Tumblr - and all week, we kept remembering this page from John Berger’s ‘Ways of Seeing’.
darkmountainproject:

Our first week in the world of Tumblr - and all week, we kept remembering this page from John Berger’s ‘Ways of Seeing’.
    High Resolution

    darkmountainproject:

    Our first week in the world of Tumblr - and all week, we kept remembering this page from John Berger’s ‘Ways of Seeing’.

  8. Comments
  9. "Nobody tells this to people who are beginners; I wish someone told me. All of us who do creative work, we get into it because we have good taste. But there is this gap. For the first couple years you make stuff, it’s just not that good. It’s trying to be good, it has potential, but it’s not. But your taste, the thing that got you into the game, is still killer. And your taste is why your work disappoints you. A lot of people never get past this phase; they quit. Most people I know who do interesting, creative work went through years of this. We know our work doesn’t have this special thing that we want it to have. We all go through this. And if you are just starting out or you are still in this phase, you gotta know it’s normal, and the most important thing you can do is do a lot of work. Put yourself on a deadline so that every week you will finish one story. It is only by going through a volume of work that you will close that gap, and your work will be as good as your ambitions. And I took longer to figure out how to do this than anyone I’ve ever met. It’s gonna take a while. It’s normal to take a while. You’ve just gotta fight your way through."

  10. Comments
  11. "We need to question that familiar categorisation of the economy as a space into which people enter in order to reluctantly undertake unwelcome and unpleasing “work”, in return for material rewards which they can use for consuming."

  12. Comments
  13. paavo:

Guy Debord’s - The Naked City (1957)
Guy Debord’s Naked City, present the most radical departure from the grid. In reaction to the rational city models embraced by Parisian postwar planners in the 1950s, he and his colleagues co-opted the map of Paris, reconfiguring the experience of the city through its authority. By manipulating the map itself, they intervened in the logic of the city, constructing an alternative geography that favored the marginalized, and often threatened, spaces of the urban grid. Torn from their geographical context, these areas were woven together by arrows inspired by the itineraries of the drift or “dérive.” These “psychogeographic” maps proposed a fragmented, subjective, and temporal experience of the city as opposed to the seemingly omnipotent perspective of the planimetric map. As mapping is used as a tactic to bring together personal narratives about urban space, the Situationist maps provide a useful example of visualizing a subjective view of the city. The central problem with these maps is not in the way in which they confront norms of cartography, but the duration to which they are bound. The ephemeral nature of psychogeographic space meant that these sites could quickly shift through the pressures of development. The Situationist maps in turn become an archive of a specific moment in the life of the city. However, if these maps incorporated time, they would be able to show the migration or disappearance of these psychogeographic spaces, highlighting and critiquing the urban trends that were / are shaping the city.
Although the Situationists most likely regarded these maps as a record of the drift and a means for provoking new tactics for inhabiting the city, they also represent a valuable schema for creating new forms of cartography. These maps uniquely propose a networked model in which spatial events are abstracted from the grid and linked according to their typology. As databases form the engines of the contemporary base map, the information they contain may be retrieved in multiple configurations, allowing for a range of methods for visualizing the space of the city. The vocabulary of geo-spatial metadata behind the contemporary base map should be expanded to include a broader set of terminologies, allowing for new interpretations of the urban landscape. For example, querying space according to ambient phenomena such as its emotional associations or pollution levels. As suggested by Kevin Lynch, visualizing urban space as a montage of typologies may in fact be closer to the fragmented way in which we create our own mental maps. Perhaps we can begin to use database driven maps to understand place within a system of relations determined by their relevance to our queries, rather than their geographic location.

(via centralunit)

    paavo:

    Guy Debord’s - The Naked City (1957)

    Guy Debord’s Naked City, present the most radical departure from the grid. In reaction to the rational city models embraced by Parisian postwar planners in the 1950s, he and his colleagues co-opted the map of Paris, reconfiguring the experience of the city through its authority. By manipulating the map itself, they intervened in the logic of the city, constructing an alternative geography that favored the marginalized, and often threatened, spaces of the urban grid. Torn from their geographical context, these areas were woven together by arrows inspired by the itineraries of the drift or “dérive.” These “psychogeographic” maps proposed a fragmented, subjective, and temporal experience of the city as opposed to the seemingly omnipotent perspective of the planimetric map. As mapping is used as a tactic to bring together personal narratives about urban space, the Situationist maps provide a useful example of visualizing a subjective view of the city.
    The central problem with these maps is not in the way in which they confront norms of cartography, but the duration to which they are bound. The ephemeral nature of psychogeographic space meant that these sites could quickly shift through the pressures of development. The Situationist maps in turn become an archive of a specific moment in the life of the city. However, if these maps incorporated time, they would be able to show the migration or disappearance of these psychogeographic spaces, highlighting and critiquing the urban trends that were / are shaping the city.

    Although the Situationists most likely regarded these maps as a record of the drift and a means for provoking new tactics for inhabiting the city, they also represent a valuable schema for creating new forms of cartography. These maps uniquely propose a networked model in which spatial events are abstracted from the grid and linked according to their typology. As databases form the engines of the contemporary base map, the information they contain may be retrieved in multiple configurations, allowing for a range of methods for visualizing the space of the city. The vocabulary of geo-spatial metadata behind the contemporary base map should be expanded to include a broader set of terminologies, allowing for new interpretations of the urban landscape. For example, querying space according to ambient phenomena such as its emotional associations or pollution levels. As suggested by Kevin Lynch, visualizing urban space as a montage of typologies may in fact be closer to the fragmented way in which we create our own mental maps. Perhaps we can begin to use database driven maps to understand place within a system of relations determined by their relevance to our queries, rather than their geographic location.

    (via centralunit)

  14. Comments
  15. kristinesamson:

    turnof-century: LOVE this installation in NYC.

  16. Comments
  17. architectural-review:

Barbican Cross section
architectural-review:

Barbican Cross section
    High Resolution

    architectural-review:

    Barbican Cross section

  18. Comments
  19. architectureofdoom:

Another acoustic listening device developed for the Dutch army as part of air defense systems, between World Wars 1 and 2.
This is half of the Czech four-horn acoustic locator, called Goerz.
architectureofdoom:

Another acoustic listening device developed for the Dutch army as part of air defense systems, between World Wars 1 and 2.
This is half of the Czech four-horn acoustic locator, called Goerz.
    High Resolution

    architectureofdoom:

    Another acoustic listening device developed for the Dutch army as part of air defense systems, between World Wars 1 and 2.

    This is half of the Czech four-horn acoustic locator, called Goerz.

  20. Comments
  21. ryanpanos:

    Live Feed Drawings by  Jordan Rodgers via The Draftery

  22. Comments
  23. Comments
  24. darylmulvihill:

Drift on Flickr.
Sara at the Oscar Niemeyer Museum, Curitiba
darylmulvihill:

Drift on Flickr.
Sara at the Oscar Niemeyer Museum, Curitiba
    High Resolution

    darylmulvihill:

    Drift on Flickr.

    Sara at the Oscar Niemeyer Museum, Curitiba

  25. Comments
  26. spatialforces:

The church of fear, or perhaps a cathedral under construction. Bacau, Romania
spatialforces:

The church of fear, or perhaps a cathedral under construction. Bacau, Romania
    High Resolution

    spatialforces:

    The church of fear, or perhaps a cathedral under construction. Bacau, Romania

  27. Comments
  28. icancauseaconstellation:

Detroit’s partially implemented Woodward Plan. 
icancauseaconstellation:

Detroit’s partially implemented Woodward Plan. 
    High Resolution

    icancauseaconstellation:

    Detroit’s partially implemented Woodward Plan. 

    (via lookitsbaseball)

  29. Comments